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Friends of the White House John Adams Collectible Christmas Ornament

SKU: USA86

Availability: In stock

$59.95

Quick Overview

President John Adams dition of the beautiful white house christmas ornament series produced by "Friends of the White House", featuring the inauguraiton of John Adams. Each ornament is hand blown, silvered, hand-painted and intricately decorated glass ornament. Elegantly gift boxed along with decriptive literature. This first in a series ornament commemorated the fascinating story behind the White House and our presidential history.

By creating the second-in-an-annual-series of ornaments, Friends of the White House honors the second President of the United States, John Adams, the first President to reside in the newly constructed White House.

The result of a centuries-old tradition of distinctive glass making, this handcrafted ornament is hand blown, silvered, individually painted, and intricately decorated by skilled artisans. Each glittering ornament is truly unique.

This ornament features a faithful reproduction of an original painting depicting President John Adams arrival at the White House on Saturday, November 1, 1800, accompanied by two gentlemen, Billy Shaw, his secretary, and John Brisling, his steward on horseback.

Incorporated into the design is President Adams’ signature along with his famous quotation regarding the White House, now found over the fireplace in the White House State Dining Room.

The famous quotation is excerpted text of a letter from John Adams to Abigail Adams, November 2, 1800, and is reproduced in John Adams own handwriting.

Permission to quote and publish text from the original manuscript of the Adams Family Papers has been given to Friends of the White House as a courtesy by the Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston, Massachusetts.

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Historical Notes

The Residence Act of 1790 established that the Federal Government would reside in “a district of territory, not exceeding ten miles square, to be located as hereafter directed on the river Potomac.”{1} Among many things, the Act provided for the building of an executive mansion to house the President’s family and staff. While George Washington supervised the construction of the President’s House, he was never an occupant. John Adams, the second President of the United States and Abigail Adams, his wife, became its first inhabitants in 1800. It was Saturday, November 1, 1800, and John Adams was anxious to arrive at his new residence in Washington City - the President’s House – now known as the White House. Although he was our nation’s second President, he was the first President to establish residency at the White House and he did so at approximately noon on this day. Upon John Adams’ arrival, construction was still ongoing. Inside the building among the laborers were two district commissioners, who were performing an inspection when they looked up and saw the President’s carriage coming to a halt in front. Accompanied by two gentlemen, Billy Shaw, his secretary, and John Brisling, his steward, John Adams stepped down from his carriage and adjusted to the scenery. What he saw was the grandest white washed stone building in all of America, despite the fact that it stood amidst rocks and rubble in a vast field of nothing but weeds and muddy ruts made by the wheels of wagons. Once inside, the President learned that 18 of the 36 rooms and only one of three staircases were completed. Despite the condition of the President’s House, it was still habitable and upon settling in, President John Adams took gentlemen callers late into the afternoon. After an extremely filled day of travel and accepting visitors, the weary President had an early dinner and retired upstairs to his bedroom for the evening. The following morning, with the smell of paint and plaster hanging heavy in the air and crackling fires burning in every fireplace, John Adams wrote to his beloved Abigail from the desk in his new office. He told Abigail of his arrival, the gentlemen callers he’d received and his desire for her presence. It was also in this letter that John Adams penned the following: “I pray Heaven to bestow the best of Blessings on this House and all that shall hereafter inhabit it. May none but honest and wise Men ever rule under this roof.”{2} This quote was highly regarded by future presidents. Franklin D. Roosevelt made sure all would see it in the State Dining Room where it was inscribed into the wooden mantelpiece. Harry Truman made sure the inscription remained intact when the White House was rebuilt during his presidency. John F. Kennedy had the quote carved in marble into the mantelpiece where it can still be seen today. Abigail Adams referred to the residence as the “Great Castle” and throughout history it was known as the “President’s House,” “President's Palace,” “Presidential Mansion,” and the “Executive Mansion.” It’s official and current name, the White House, was established in 1901 by President Theodore Roosevelt. Since this remarkable edifice was constructed, the White House has been slightly changed during each presidency; depicting the unique touch of each U.S. President throughout history. Today the building, located at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, D.C., still functions as the President’s personal home; however, unlike most other presidential residences around the world, the White House serves the public as well. The White House is free and open for people to enter, explore and to appreciate the many legacies that fill the walls of this significant cornerstone of the United States of America.

Additional Information

Historical Notes The Residence Act of 1790 established that the Federal Government would reside in “a district of territory, not exceeding ten miles square, to be located as hereafter directed on the river Potomac.”{1} Among many things, the Act provided for the building of an executive mansion to house the President’s family and staff. While George Washington supervised the construction of the President’s House, he was never an occupant. John Adams, the second President of the United States and Abigail Adams, his wife, became its first inhabitants in 1800. It was Saturday, November 1, 1800, and John Adams was anxious to arrive at his new residence in Washington City - the President’s House – now known as the White House. Although he was our nation’s second President, he was the first President to establish residency at the White House and he did so at approximately noon on this day. Upon John Adams’ arrival, construction was still ongoing. Inside the building among the laborers were two district commissioners, who were performing an inspection when they looked up and saw the President’s carriage coming to a halt in front. Accompanied by two gentlemen, Billy Shaw, his secretary, and John Brisling, his steward, John Adams stepped down from his carriage and adjusted to the scenery. What he saw was the grandest white washed stone building in all of America, despite the fact that it stood amidst rocks and rubble in a vast field of nothing but weeds and muddy ruts made by the wheels of wagons. Once inside, the President learned that 18 of the 36 rooms and only one of three staircases were completed. Despite the condition of the President’s House, it was still habitable and upon settling in, President John Adams took gentlemen callers late into the afternoon. After an extremely filled day of travel and accepting visitors, the weary President had an early dinner and retired upstairs to his bedroom for the evening. The following morning, with the smell of paint and plaster hanging heavy in the air and crackling fires burning in every fireplace, John Adams wrote to his beloved Abigail from the desk in his new office. He told Abigail of his arrival, the gentlemen callers he’d received and his desire for her presence. It was also in this letter that John Adams penned the following: “I pray Heaven to bestow the best of Blessings on this House and all that shall hereafter inhabit it. May none but honest and wise Men ever rule under this roof.”{2} This quote was highly regarded by future presidents. Franklin D. Roosevelt made sure all would see it in the State Dining Room where it was inscribed into the wooden mantelpiece. Harry Truman made sure the inscription remained intact when the White House was rebuilt during his presidency. John F. Kennedy had the quote carved in marble into the mantelpiece where it can still be seen today. Abigail Adams referred to the residence as the “Great Castle” and throughout history it was known as the “President’s House,” “President's Palace,” “Presidential Mansion,” and the “Executive Mansion.” It’s official and current name, the White House, was established in 1901 by President Theodore Roosevelt. Since this remarkable edifice was constructed, the White House has been slightly changed during each presidency; depicting the unique touch of each U.S. President throughout history. Today the building, located at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, D.C., still functions as the President’s personal home; however, unlike most other presidential residences around the world, the White House serves the public as well. The White House is free and open for people to enter, explore and to appreciate the many legacies that fill the walls of this significant cornerstone of the United States of America.
Product Condition Brand New
Condition new
size Large 5" tall ornament
Price $59.95

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